PKU-UChicago Summer Institute on IR Theory and Method

All day
Through August 6, 2015

Begins
Aug. 3

2015年8月6日,第二届北京大学-芝加哥大学国际关系理论与方法暑期班圆满结束,来自芝加哥大学、北京大学、普林斯顿大学等学校的顶级名师,在芝加哥大学北京中心联袂授课,为国内外青年学生与学者带来了一场国际关系理论与方法的学术“盛宴”。

为期四天的暑期班包括共计23门课,涵盖方法论、博弈论、国际关系理论、国际安全、国际政治经济学和中国外交等领域。此次暑期班吸引了来自中国、美国、日本、英国、韩国、墨西哥、泰国等国内外130余名青年学者、硕博研究生以及少数本科生的积极参与。每节课都引发了学生们的踊跃提问和积极思考。很多学员表示,来参加这个暑期班的最大收获之一,就是能够近距离地跟驰名国际关系学界的顶尖学者进行学术交流,并在思想的交流中深入理解社会科学研究的逻辑和实证的重要性。这一暑期班使学员们开阔了视野,加深了对于国际关系研究方法的理解,并为将来进一步的学习和研究打下了良好的基础。

CO-DIRECTORS

Robert A. Pape

Professor, Political Science Department

Director, Chicago Project on Security and Terrorism

University of Chicago

Wang Dong

Associate Professor & Deputy Executive Director

School of International Studies

Institute for China-US People to People Exchange

Peking University

STEERING COMMITTEE

Jia Qingguo

Dean, Peking University School of International Studies

Dali L. Yang
William C. Reavis Professor of Political Science and Faculty Director, Center in Beijing
University of Chicago

Fan Shiming

Associate Dean, Peking University School of International Studies

Wu Qiang

Associate Dean, Peking University School of International Studies

Michael Rowley

Executive Director, Chicago Project on Security and Terrorism

University of Chicago

About the Summer Institute

From Quincy Wright after World War I to Hans Morgenthau after World War II to our current faculty, the University of Chicago has long been at the forefront of creating new scholarship on international relations (IR). The distinctive feature of Chicago’s approach has been the development of new theories about IR that seek to explain leading issues concerning international security, political economy, and conflict and cooperation among states in general. The Chicago Project on Security and Terrorism (CPOST), a key part of this tradition, proposes to conduct a summer institute introducing the core concepts of Chicago’s approach to one of the largest, fastest growing, and most important next generation of scholars of IR – Chinese graduate students and young faculty in Beijing and from across the country. The purpose of this institute is to offer education in theory and the development of scholarship, provide stimulus for important ideas within the field, and to help foster Chinese scholarship worthy of publication in top Western journals as well as around the world.

CPOST has the pleasure of partnering with Peking University School of International Studies (SIS) and the University of Chicago Center in Beijing for the 2015 Summer Institute on International Relations Theory and Method following the successful program in summer 2014.

 

TYPES OF SESSIONS

 

Lecture – A major presentation by a faculty member on a general topic. The lecture is   about 40 minutes, with 20 minutes of Q&A.

 

Roundtable Discussion – Quick presentations by faculty members, giving their opinions on the given subject, followed by questions.

Spark Talk – A major presentation by a faculty member or graduate student focused on a very specific research area within the field. The talk is 10 minutes, with 20 minutes of Q&A.

Workshop – A short presentation, followed by long discussion of an unpublished faculty/student manuscript, with the goal to provide comments to the author for revision so that the paper becomes higher quality and publishable. (Assigned reading: 25-30 page paper to read the night before the workshop)

SCHEDULE

*Most of the summer institute will be at the Event Space of the UChicago Center in Beijing unless otherwise specified for the breakout sessions August 5 – 6.

Monday, August 3rd, 2015

Theme of the Day: Conference on China and Regional Integration

 

08:30 – 09:30                                Registration

 

09:30 – 09:45                                Welcome Remarks

Wang Yizhou, PKU

Dali Yang, UChicago

 

09:45 – 10:45                                Lecture: Causal Logic of International Relations

Robert Pape, UChicago

Course Description: This course lays out the general pattern of International Relations as studied at the University of Chicago. One of the distinguishing features of University of Chicago International Relations is the importance of theoretical robustness and clear causal logics which lead to testable, falsifiable implications.

 

10:45 – 11:00                                Break

Morning Session of the Conference: East Asia, Institutions and Trade Liberalization

Chair: Robert Gulotty

 

11:00 – 11:45                                Lecture: China and International Institutional Order

Xinyuan Dai, Illinois

Course Description: This paper asks what is international liberal order? What does the rise of China mean for that order? To address these important questions, joint with Jason Renn, we construct a new dataset and develop a new metric of a country’s embeddedness in the international institutional order. Our analysis leads us to reconsider prominent conjectures about China’s involving relationship to the international liberal order.

 

11:45 – 12:30                                Lecture: Production Networks and Preferential

Trade Agreements in Asia

Soo Yeon Kim, Singapore

Course Description: This paper is on free trade agreements and the progression of regional integration in Asia. The research highlights the role of production networks and multinational firms in shaping deep integration commitments in trade agreements.

 

12:30 – 14:00                                Lunch

 

14:00 – 14:30                                Lecture: IPE in China

Zha Daojiong, PKU

Course Description: This course describes the state of International Political Economy study in China, including any idiosyncrasies which cause it to differ from how International Relations is studied outside of China.

 

Afternoon Session of the Conference: Microfoundations of Trade Liberalization

Chair: Dali Yang

 

14:30 – 15:15                                Lecture: How Do Trade Agreements Affect Trade?

Raymond Hicks, Princeton

Course Description: This paper shows that the raft of PTAs in recent years has been accompanied by an increase in a practice called trade-based money laundering, wherein countries overvalue their imports on official registries in ways that do not match up with the actual value of their partners’ exports in those sectors. When tariffs are in place, overreporting imports leads to higher duties paid. Perversely, by reducing or eliminating tariffs, PTAs increase the profitability of money laundering. (co-author: Julia Gray)

 

15:15 – 16:00                                Lecture: Domestic Responses to Global Production Diversion: Evidence from Chinese Manufacturing Firms

Xiaojun Li, UBC

Robert Gulotty, UChicago

Course Description: This paper uses the China Annual Survey of Manufacturing Firms coverage 350,000 Chinese manufacturers to examine the response of state, foreign and local privately held firms to the possibility of new forms of behind the border trade cooperation in the TPP.  In doing so, this paper establishes the role of modern preferential trade agreements in the organization and distribution of the profits of global production in excluded markets. Furthermore, this analysis will also help shed light on the relationship between China the global trade regime.

 

16:00 – 16:15                                Break

 

16:15 – 17:00                                Lecture: Globalization and State Capitalism: Assessing  Vietnam’s Accession to the WTO

Leonard Baccini, McGill

Course Description: This paper is on the role of trade-induced selection and reallocation of firms in an economy with State Owned Enterprises.  Using a new dataset of Vietnamese firms, it finds that `State Capitalism’ in Vietnam represents a large obstacle to trade-induced efficiency gains.

 

17:00 – 17:30                                Remarks

Andrew Moravcsik, Princeton

 

17:30 – 17:45                                Closing

 

17:45 – 18:00                                Tea Reception

 

 

Tuesday, August 4th, 2015

Theme of the Day: Domestic Politics in International Relations

08:00 – 08:30                                Registration

 

08:30 – 09:30                                Lecture: China’s Development and Insecurity Complex

Dali Yang, UChicago

Course Description: As the Chinese economy slows down in what officials hope would be “the new normal,” the Chinese leadership has become preoccupied with the challenges that slower growth would engender. In this presentation, I discuss how this ongoing transition may have affected China’s efforts to seek national security both within China and outside of it.

 

09:30 – 09:40                                Break

 

09:40 – 10:40                                Lecture: Chinese Approach to International Relations

Zhang Xiaoming, PKU

Course Description: This course describes the state of International Theory study in China, including any idiosyncrasies which cause it to differ from how International Relations is studied outside of China.

 

10:40 – 10:50                                Break

 

10:50 – 11:50                                Lecture: Domestic Audience Costs in China

Xiaojun Li, UBC

Course Description: Domestic audience costs refer to the punishment imposed on leaders by their citizens for backing down from making foreign commitments and threats. Do such costs exist in China as well? We will explore this question empirically using survey experiments conducted with Chinese netizens.

 

11:50 – 12:00                                Break

 

12:00 – 12:30                                Lecture: Trust but Verify: What the Digital and Transparency Revolutions in Qualitative Social Science Mean for You

Andrew Moravcsik, Princeton

Course Description: Research standards are changing quickly in political science. As soon as January 2016, many who publish qualitative research based on historical, interview and other text-based sources will be obliged to provide digitally-enabled “active” citations hyperlinked to textual sources, analytical interpretation and methodological information. This talk describes this trend and explains what it will mean for you as a researcher.

 

12:30 – 13:30                                Lunch

 

13:30 – 15:30                                Roundtable Discussion: What is Expected of an IR Paper in US and in China

Robert Golotty, UChicago

Jenna Jordan, Georgia Tech

Sebastian Schmidt, Johns Hopkins

Zhang Qingmin, PKU

Wang Dong, PKU

 

15:30 – 15:45                                Break

 

15:45 – 17:45                                Example Workshop

Why Conventional War in Asia Will Not Happen

Presenter: Robert Pape, UChicago

Discussant: Ben Lessing, UChicago

Chair: Andrew Moravcsik, Princeton

 

17:45 – 18:00                                Tea Reception

 

 

Wednesday, August 5th, 2015

Theme of the Day: International Security

08:00 – 08:30                                Registration

 

08:30 – 09:30                                Lecture: Internal Security & Civil War

Paul Staniland, UChicago

The lecture will be delivered via Skype.

Course Description: Civil wars, militarized elections, and cooperation between states and militias are among the most prominent features of the contemporary international security environment. This lecture will explore recent research on insurgency, electoral violence, and patterns of state-armed group conflict and collusion, using a mix of conceptual and theoretical frameworks with empirical examples.

 

09:30 – 09:45                                Break

 

09:45 – 10:45                                Lecture: International Security Studies in China

Yu Tiejun, PKU

Course Description: This course describes the state of International Security study in China, including any idiosyncrasies which cause it to differ from how International Relations is studied outside of China.

 

10:45 – 11:00                                Break

 

11:00 – 11:30                                Spark Talks

Robert Gulotty, UChicago, “Causal Inference in International Relations”

David Benson, Post-Doc Fellow, Southern Methodist, “The Internet, International Relations and China”

Stephanie Kelly, Ph.D. Candidate, UChicago, “When the Military Obeys Orders to Suppress Domestic Unrest”

 

11:30 – 11:45                                Break

 

11:45 – 12:45                                Lecture: Logic of Violence in Criminal War

Ben Lessing, UChicago

Course Description: Why do criminal groups like drug cartels and prison gangs sometimes engage the state in sustained armed violence, if, unlike insurgencies, they seek neither to topple or secede from the state? This talk explores the logics that motivate criminal conflict and how they differ from those that drive classic civil wars.

 

12:45 – 13:45                                Lunch

 

13:45 – 14:45                                Lecture: Explaining Terrorist Group Resilience to Leadership Targeting

Jenna Jordan, Georgia Tech

Course Description: This talk will look at the efficacy of leadership targeting as a counterterrorism policy. In order to explain why certain terrorist groups are more susceptible to leadership decapitation, I will discuss a theory of organizational resilience.

 

14:45 – 15:00                                Break

 

15:00 – 15:30                                Spark Talks

Robert Gulotty, UChicago, “Causal Inference in International Relations”

David Benson, Post-Doc Fellow, Southern Methodist, “The Internet, International Relations and China”

Stephanie Kelly, Ph.D. Candidate, UChicago, “When the Military Obeys Orders to Suppress Domestic Unrest”

 

15:30 – 15:45                                Break

 

15:45 – 17:45                                Parallel Workshops. I. – IV.

 

 

Workshop I. Hedging in International Relations: China’s Rise and the Asian Countries’ Hedging Behavior

Venue: Lecture Hall

Presenter: Wang Dong, PKU

Discussant: Gentry Jenkins, Ph. D. Candidate, UChicago

Chair: Robert Pape, UChicago

 

Workshop II. A Structural Theory of Status Seeking Behavior: Positional Power and Social Network Analysis

Venue: Large Classroom

Presenter: Jenna Jordan, Georgia Tech

Discussant: Mariya Grinberg, Ph. D. Candidate, UChicago

Chair: Ben Lessing, UChicago

 

Workshop III. Money Laundering as an Unintended

Consequence of Preferential Trade Agreements

Venue: Small Classroom

Presenter: Raymond Hicks, Princeton

Discussant: Yubing Sheng, Ph.D. Candidate, UChicago

Chair: Andrew Kydd, UW-Madison

 

Workshop IV. Defiant Partners: Lessons from Recent U.S. Experiences in Alliance Restraint

Venue: Event Space

Presenter: Jie Dalei, PKU

Discussant: David Benson, Post-Doc Fellow, Southern Methodist

Chair: Robert Gulotty, UChicago

 

17:45 – 18:00                                Tea Reception

 

 

Thursday, August 6th, 2015

Theme of the Day: International Relations Theory

08:00 – 08:30                                Registration

 

08:30 – 09:30                                Lecture: Applying Game Theory to International Relations: The Issue of Korean Unification

Andrew Kydd, UW-Madison

Course Description: Basic normal form games will be applied to the question of US-Chinese cooperation over Korean unification.  We will complete a short survey to assess how individuals see the strategic situation, and then examine whether mutual cooperation is possible given those preferences and what the obstacles to it are.

 

09:30 – 09:45                                Break

 

09:45 – 10:45                                Lecture: China’s New Diplomacy

Wang Yizhou, PKU

Course Description: This course is to examine the newly emerging features and trends in China’s diplomacy.

 

10:45 – 11:00                                Break

 

11:00 – 11:30                                Spark Talks

Robert Gulotty, UChicago, “Causal Inference in International Relations”

David Benson, Post-Doc Fellow, Southern Methodist, “The Internet, International Relations and China”

Stephanie Kelly, Ph.D. Candidate, UChicago, “When the Military Obeys Orders to Suppress Domestic Unrest”

 

11:30 – 11:45                                Break

 

11:45 – 12:45                                Lecture: Norms Change in International Politics

Sebastan Schmidt, Johns Hopkins

Course Description: Scholars have identified a variety of routes through which norms, or the standards of appropriate behavior that inform the actions of state representatives in international politics, might change. This lecture describes a novel pathway of norm change and applies it to help explain the origin of a common contemporary security practice: the long-term, peacetime presence of one state’s military on the territory of another equally sovereign state.

 

12:45 – 13:45                                Lunch

 

13:45 – 14:45                                Lecture: Diagraming Causal Logic

Robert Pape, UChicago

Course Description: This is an interactive session where Professor Pape will work with the audience to create conceptual maps of causal logics.   The subject matter will focus on one of the most famous debates in international relations theory:   How does the number of great powers impact the stability of international politics?

 

14:45 – 15:00                                Break

 

15:00 – 17:00                                Parallel Workshops. I. – IV.

 

Workshop I. Efficient Deterrence and the Cross-strait Relations in the Post-Cold War Era

Venue: Lecture Hall

Presenter: Yin Chengzhi, Ph. D. Candidate, PKU

Discussant: Yubing Sheng, Ph.D. Candidate, UChicago

Chair: Jenna Jordan, Georgia Tech

 

Workshop II. Retreat or Redeployment? Redefine Obama’ National Security Strategy

Venue: Large Classroom

Presenter: Sun Bingyan, Ph. D. Candidate, PKU

Discussant: Mariya Grinberg, Ph. D. Candidate, UChicago

Chair: Sebastian Schmidt, Johns Hopkins

 

Workshop III. The Carter Government’s Assessment, Analysis and Policy–Making on the Sino-Vietnamese Conflict

Venue: Small Classroom

Presenter: Shen Dongpu, PKU

Discussant: Gentry Jenkins, Ph. D. Candidate, UChicago

Chair: Andrew Kydd, UW-Madison

 

Workshop IV. Social Role of Former U.S. Presidents

Venue: Event Space

Presenter: Wu Shengqi, Post-Doc Fellow, PKU

Discussant: Stephanie Kelly, Graduate Student, UChicago

Chair: David Benson, Post-Doc Fellow, Southern Methodist

 

17:00 – 17:30                                Closing Remarks

17:30 – 18:00                                Tea Reception

 

 


ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

 

Leonardo Baccini

Leonardo Baccini is a newly appointed Assistant Professor at McGill University, and recently served as an Assistant Professor in the IR Department at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Before joining LSE, he was a research fellow at Princeton University and New York University as well as an assistant professor at IMT Lucca.

His research interests are in the area of international political economy and comparative political economy with a focus on trade, developing countries, and international organizations.

 

Xinyuan Dai

Xinyuan Dai is associate professor of political science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her book International Institutions and National Policies (2007) discusses how the proliferation of international institutions and their impact has become a central issue in international relations.

She presents an alternative framework in which international institutions influence national policies indirectly, utilizing non-state actors (NGOs, social movements) and empowering domestic constituencies. In this way, even weak international institutions that lack “carrots and sticks” may have powerful effects on states. Published in journals such as Global Environmental Politics, Journal of Conflict Resolution, International Organization, World Politics, and Social Networks, she received the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation Research Fellowship in 2008. She holds an MA from Peking University and a PhD from the University of Chicago.

 

Robert Gulotty

Robert Gulotty was a postdoctoral researcher in the department of Political Science at Stanford University until summer 2015 when he became an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago. His research interests include international political economy and political methodology. He received his Ph.D. in Political Science at Stanford University, where he also completed a postdoctoral appointment for the 2014-2015 academic year. He earned an M.A. in Economics at Stanford University, and B.A.s in both Political Science and Philosophy from The Ohio State University in 2008.

His dissertation centers on the contemporary period of global production and regulatory protection-seeking to understand why regulatory cooperation has been so difficult. Gulotty explores the significant role of non-trade barriers in the global economy, influencing the decisions and actions of both internationalized firms and governments.

Robert has also been publishing extensively with Judith Goldstein about the effects of institutions and ideas on trade policy. Their article, “America and Trade Liberalization: The Limits of Institutional Reform,” will be featured in International Organization this summer. Gulotty is also working with Alexander Keck on “Revealed Protectionism: In search of a neutral benchmark for WTO adjudication.”

 

Raymond Hicks

Raymond Hicks is a statistical programmer at the Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance at Princeton University. He received his PhD in political science from Emory University and a BA from the College of William and Mary. Hicks’ work has appeared or is forthcoming in the Stata Journal, The Journal of East Asian Studies, International Organization, International Studies Quarterly, the Journal of Politics and the Review of International Organizations. His research focuses on the effects of political institutions on economic outcomes. More specifically, he is interested in why institutions such as trade agreements or central bank independence sometimes affect trade or inflation and at other times has no effect. He has examined these issues both at the macro and the micro-level. Additionally, some of his research focuses more specifically on methodological issues involved in looking at these issues.

 

Jie Dalei

Dalei Jie is currently an assistant professor at the School of International Studies of Peking University in Beijing, China. He is interested in security studies related to China, the U.S., and East Asia. He got his Ph.D. degree in political science from the University of Pennsylvania in 2012, and his doctoral dissertation was titled “The Rise and Fall of the Taiwan Independence Policy: Power Shift, Domestic Constraints, and Sovereignty Assertiveness.” Before coming to Penn, he studied at Peking University, where he got his B.A. in international studies and economics as well as an M.A. in international politics. He has published articles in journals such as Asian Security and Journal of International Studies (in Chinese) and in edited volumes.

 

Jennifer Jordan

Jenna Jordan is an assistant professor in the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Her research interests include terrorism, population transfers, attachment to territory, and international security. Her book manuscript focuses on the leadership decapitation of terrorist organizations. Jordan received her Ph.D. in political science from the University of Chicago, M.A. in Political Science from Stanford University, and B.A. in International Relations from Mills College. She previously held a post-doctoral research fellowship at the Harris School of Public Policy Studies at the University of Chicago. Her research has been supported by grants from the Smith Richardson Foundation and the University of Chicago.

 

Soo Yeon Kim

Soo Yeon Kim joined the Department of Political Science of the National University Singapore in July 2011. She holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from Yale University and a B.A. in Political Science and International Studies from Yonsei University. Professor Kim’s research and teaching areas are International Political Economy, International Political Economy of Asia, and Research Methods, with a specialization in trade politics. She is the author of Power and the Governance of Global Trade (2011, Series in Political Economy, Cornell University Press). Her current research focuses on free trade agreements in Asia and on rising powers in the global economy.

 

Andrew Kydd

Andrew Kydd received his Ph. D. in Political Science from the University of Chicago in 1996 and taught at the University of California, Riverside and Harvard University before joining the Department of Political Science at the University of Wisconsin in the fall of 2007. His interests center on the game theoretic analysis of international security issues such as proliferation, terrorism, trust and conflict resolution. He has published articles in the American Political Science Review, International Organization, World Politics, and International Security, among other journals. His book, Trust and Mistrust in International Relations, was published in 2005 by Princeton University Press and won the 2006 Conflict Processes Best Book Award.

 

Benjamin Lessing

Benjamin Lessing is an Assistant Professor in Political Science at the University of Chicago, where he serves as a CPOST Assistant Director and co-leads the Center on Political Violence with Paul Staniland. He studies “criminal conflict”—organized armed violence involving non-state actors who, unlike revolutionary insurgents, are not trying to topple the state. His doctoral dissertation examines armed conflict between drug cartels and the state in Colombia, Mexico, and Brazil, and recently won the INEGI/UNODC Second International Thesis Contest on Public Security, Victimization, and Justice in Latin America. Additionally, he has studied prison gangs’ pernicious effect on state authority and how paramilitary groups use territorial control to influence electoral outcomes.

His publications include “When Business Gets Bloody: State Policy and Drug Violence” in Small Arms Survey 2012, and “Tres Mitos Sobre la Guerra del Narco [Three Misconceptions about the Drug War]” in Perspectivas Sobre Desarrollo.

Dr. Lessing received an MA in economics and a PhD in political science from the University of California, Berkeley. He also holds a BA in economics and philosophy from Kenyon College. He recently completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford University’s Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (CDDRL) and the Center on International Security and Cooperation (CISAC). Prior to his graduate work, Lessing conducted field research on the small arms trade in Latin America and the Caribbean for numerous international organizations. In addition, he was a Fulbright student grantee in Argentina, Brazil, and Uruguay.

 

Xiaojun Li

Xiaojun Li joined the political science department of the University of British Columbia in 2013. His research falls broadly in the area of international and comparative political economy with a focus on China. His work has appeared in Asian Survey, Chinese Journal of International Politics, Foreign Policy Analysis as well as edited volumes. He is currently working on a book manuscript that examines the domestic sources of the wide variation in both statutory and administered protection across Chinese manufacturing industries during and after China’s accession to the World Trade Organization. He will be offering courses in international political economy, Chinese government and politics, and China in world politics.

 

Andrew Moravcsik

ANDREW MORAVCSIK is Professor of Politics and Director of the European Union Program at Princeton University. He has authored over 125 scholarly publications on European integration, transatlantic relations, international relations and law, human rights, qualitative methods and other topics. His history of the European Union, The Choice for Europe, has been called “the most important work in the field.” He has developed “active citation,” a digital standard designed to enhance the transparency and prestige of text-based `qualitative research. He was recently awarded the Stanley Kelley Award for Undergraduate Teaching. As a policy-maker, he has served as trade negotiator for the US Government, special assistant to the Korea’s Deputy Prime Minister, press assistant at the EU’s European Commission, editor of a Washington foreign policy journal and, since 2004, as a Non-Resident Senior Fellow of the Brookings Institution. Over 100 of his news commentaries and policy analyses have appeared in Foreign Affairs, where he is Book Review Editor (Europe); Newsweek, where he was Contributing Editor; and many other publications. He has been a long-term visitor at research institutes in France, Italy, Britain, and China, where he spent one year at the Shanghai Institute for International Studies. His commentary on classical music, especially opera, has appeared in Financial Times, New York Times, Opera and other publications—a subject on which he also publishes scholarly research. He holds degrees from Stanford, Johns Hopkins and Harvard, and has studied at German and French universities. He is married to Anne-Marie Slaughter, with whom he has two sons, Michael Edward (18) and Alexander (16).

 

Robert A. Pape

Robert A. Pape is Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago, and Director of the Chicago Project on Security and Terrorism. He is one of the world’s foremost experts on both strategic air power and terrorism, having published Cutting the Fuse: The Global Expansion of Suicide Terrorism and How to Stop It (2010), Dying to Win: The Strategic Logic of Suicide Terrorism, and Bombing to Win: Airpower and Coercion in War (1996). Dr. Pape received his PhD from the University of Chicago in 1988 and graduated summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Pittsburgh in 1982. His current work focuses on the targeting logic of suicide terrorist organizations, humanitarian intervention policy, and the future of US-China relations.

 

Sebastian Schmidt

Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins University

Ph.D., University of Chicago, 2015

Sebastian Schmidt is interested in the sociological foundations of security strategies and in particular the conditions under which novel strategies emerge. His research is closely tied to understanding how norms change in international politics and the role of tacit knowledge. He also has a long-standing interest in the historical development of sovereignty. His work, which has appeared in the American Political Science Review and International Studies Quarterly, has investigated the origin of foreign basing practices and has sought to shed light on how concepts used by international relations scholars influence assessments of historical change. His current and future work is focused on the elaboration of a pragmatist theoretical perspective on international politics with attendant empirical applications as well as on exploring the development of deterrence strategies through history.

 

Paul Staniland

Paul Staniland is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago, where he also serves as a CPOST Assistant Director and co-leads CPOST’s Center on Political Violence with Ben Lessing. He also co-directs the Program on International Security Policy. His research interests are in political violence, international security, and state formation, primarily in South and Southeast Asia. His book, Networks of Rebellion: Explaining Insurgent Cohesion and Collapse, was published by Cornell University Press in 2014. He is currently writing a book on armed politics and the state in post-colonial South Asia. Other work examines foreign security policy in India, empire and its legacies, electoral violence, and the links between war and state building.

His research has been published in Asian Survey, Civil Wars, Comparative Politics, Comparative Political Studies, Governance, Journal of Conflict Resolution, India Review, International Security, International Studies Quarterly, Perspectives on Politics, Security Studies, and the Washington Quarterly, among others. He has done fieldwork in India, Sri Lanka, Burma/Myanmar, Thailand, Singapore, and Northern Ireland.

 

Wang Dong

Wang Dong is Associate Professor in the School of International Studies and Executive Deputy Director of the Institute for China-U.S. People to People Exchange at Peking University. He also concurrently serves as Deputy Secretary General of the Center for American Studies, and Member of the Academic Committee of the Institute of International and Strategic Studies, both at Peking University, as well as Member of the Steering Committee of the “East Asia Security Forum”, Chinese Overseas Educated Scholars Association, and Academic Committee Member of the Pangoal Institute.

Wang Dong received his bachelor in law from Peking University and M.A. and Ph.D. in political science from University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). Dr. Wang had taught at York College of Pennsylvania, with a tenure-track appointment, before joining the faculty of Peking University. Since 2011, he has also been a Research Associate at the East Asian Peace Program, Uppsala University.

Dr. Wang has written extensively on international relations and China’s foreign policy. His articles and reviews appear in The New York Times as well as other leading academic and news outlets, including preeminent U.S. think tanks such as Center for Strategic and International Studies, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, National Bureau of Asian Research. Dr. Wang has provided consultation to China’s State Council and Ministry of Foreign Affairs on matters important to Chinese foreign policy. He has also served as Chinese delegate for important Track-II dialogues such as the Shangri-La Dialogue. Dr. Wang has been frequently interviewed by leading news agencies, newspapers, and major television programs such as the Reuters, the Associated Press, AFP, the Financial Times, the Economist, the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, USA Today, BBC, Sky News, etc.

He has received many awards and was named an inaugural “China’s Rising Leader” by the National Bureau of Asian Research (NBR) in 2011.

 

Wang Yizhou

Yizhou Wang is Professor of international politics and China Foreign Affairs, Associate Dean in the School of International Studies (SIS), Peking University, a position he’s been serving since late 2009. He is also Chief Editor of the bimonthly magazine International Politics. He was the Chief Editor of World Economics and Politics, a monthly magazine, from 1998 to 2008. He served as Deputy Director in the Institute of World Economics and Politics (IWEP), Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS) at Beijing from 1998-2009. Yizhou Wang’s main research interests include China’s diplomacy and its process into a global partnership, IR theories and its studies in the West and China, and Trends of international institutions and laws. Dr. Wang has published widely, some of his books include: International Politics, 1995, Beijing; IR studies in the West: History and Theories, 1998, Shanghai; Construction within Contradiction: Multiple Perspectives on the Relationship between China and International Organizations, 2003, Beijing; Global Politics and China’s Diplomacy, 2003, Beijing; IR Studies in China (1995-2005), 2006, Beijing; New Thinking of China’s Diplomacy, 2007, Tokyo; Highland of China Foreign Policy, 2008, Beijing; Creative Involvement: New Direction of China Diplomacy,2011, Beijing; Creative Involvement: Evolution of China’s Global Role, 2013, Beijing. Dr. Wang received his undergraduate education at Hubei University in Wuhan and went on to the Graduate School of CASS where he received his MA and Ph.D. degrees. He was a visiting scholar at the Hungary Academy of Sciences in 1988 when he started working at CASS as Associate Professor and researcher, Director in the Division of International Politics, until he was appointed Full Professor of International Politics at IWEP, CASS in 1994. From 1996 to 1997, Dr. Wang was a Visiting Scholar at CFIA, Harvard University. When he came back, he was appointed Deputy Director of IWEP, CASS until he moved to Peking University SIS as the Associate Dean in 2009.

 

Dali L. Yang

Dali L. Yang is William C. Reavis Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Chicago. He is the founding Faculty Director of the University of Chicago Center in Beijing, a university-wide initiative to promote collaboration and exchange between UChicago scholars and students and their Chinese counterparts.

Professor Yang previously served in a number of other academic leadership roles. He was Chairman of the Political Science Department, Director of The Center for East Asian Studies, and Director of the Committee on International Relations, all at the University of Chicago. He also served as Director of the East Asian Institute at the National University of Singapore.

Professor Yang is a Board member of the Paulson Institute at the University of Chicago, a member of the Committee of 100, a member of the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations, as well as a member of the China Committee of the Chicago Sister Cities International Program. He is a frequent public speaker and has been a consultant to industry, government agencies, and the World Bank. He was a team member and contributor to the Chicago Council on Global Affairs report The United States and the Rise of China and India (2006).

Professor Yang has served on the editorial boards of various journals such as American Political Science Review, Would Politics, and the Journal of Contemporary China. He has been a co-director of the University of Chicago Workshop on East Asia: Politics, Economy and Society. He is a member of the American Political Science Association and the Association for Asian Studies.

An engineering graduate of Beijing Science and Technology University, Yang Received his PhD in political science from Princeton University. He joined the University of Chicago faculty in 1992.

 

Yu Tiejun

Yu Tiejun is an associate professor in the School of International Studies (SIS) and Assistant President of the Institute of International and Strategic Studies at Peking University. Previously, he studied at the University of Tokyo in 1998-2000, and served as visiting fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University in 2005, and also as visiting scholar at the Fairbank Center for East Asian Research at Harvard University in 2005-06. Dr. Yu has co-edited The Sino-Japanese Security and Defense Exchange: Past, Present, and Prospect (Beijing: World Affairs Press, 2012, with Zhu Feng and Akiyama Masahiro). He is also the Chinese translator of Myths of Empire by Jack Snyder (2007) and Discord and Collaboration: Essays on International Politics by Arnold Wolfers (2006). His research interests include International Security, China-U.S.-Japan Relations, and China’s National Defense Policy. He won the Excellent Teaching Award of Peking University in 2010. Dr. Yu received his Ph.D., M.A. and B.A. from Peking University.

 

Zha Daojiong

Zha Daojiong is a professor of international political economy at the School of International Studies at Peking University,where he specializes in studying such non-traditional security topics as energy, food, and trans-boundary water use. His recent research interest has expanded to political/societal risk management for Chinese foreign direct investment in developing as well as developed economies. His Area Studies expertise covers Southeast Asia, the trans-Pacific region, and Africa. Zha is the author and editor of several books, including Managing Regional Energy Vulnerabilities in East Asia (Routledge, 2013), Building a Neighborly Community: Post-Cold War China, Japan, and Southeast Asia (Manchester University Press, 2006), The International Political Economy of China’s Oil Supply Security (in Chinese, 2005), and China’s International Relations in the 21st Century: Dynamics of Paradigm Shifts (University Press of America, 2000). He has published dozens of academic articles in refereed journals in English and Chinese. Prior to his tenure at Peking University (since 2007), he taught at the University of Macao, the International University of Japan, and Renmin University of China. Zha studied at the University of Hawaii, where he received his Ph.D. in Political Science.

 

Zhang Qingmin

Qingmin Zhang is Professor and Chair of the Department of Diplomacy and Foreign Affairs, the School of International Studies Peking University. His teaching and research include Chinese Foreign Policy, Diplomatic Studies, Theory of Foreign Policy Analysis, Sino-U.S. relations, and China and East Asia. He is the author of China’s Foreign Relations (2003), U.S. Arms Sales Policy toward Taiwan: a Decision-Making Perspective (2006), China’s Diplomacy, (Chinese edition 2010; English edition 2011), and several dozen peer reviewed academic journal articles. He has been on the editorial board of Foreign Policy Analysis (2005-2010) and The Hague Journal of Diplomatic Studies (2012-), and has coedited and contributed to dozens of books on Chinese foreign policy in both Chinese and English. He has been a Senior Fulbright Visiting Scholar at George Washington University’s Elliot School of International Affairs from 2004-2005, a visiting professor at Faculty Jean Monnet, University Paris Sud (2007), Niigata University, Japan(2008), University of Palermo, Italy (2009), and Visiting Professor at Tokyo University (2013) and National Chengchi University in Taiwan (2013). He received his M.A. from Brigham Young University in Utah, USA and his Ph.D. from China Foreign Affairs University.

 

Zhang Xiaoming

Xiaoming Zhang is a professor of international relations at School of International Studies, Peking University, Beijing, China, where he has taught since 1988. He was educated at Peking University (BA in 1985, MA in 1988 and Ph.D. in 1993). He has been working on Cold War history, China’s relations with its neighboring countries, US-East Asia relations, and theory of international relations. He is the author of several books in Chinese: George F. Kennan’s Containment (1994), Cold War and Its Legacy (1998), China’s Relations with Its Neighbors (2003), English School of International Relations: History, Theory, and View on China (2010), An Introduction to the History of US-East Asia Relations (2011). He also published English articles in Review of International Studies, Asian Perspective and East Asia among others. He was a fellow of Cold War International History Project at Woodrow Wilson Center (1994), fellow of Korea Foundation at Korea University (1998), Fulbright research scholar at Harvard University (1999-2000), guest researcher at Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (2000), visiting professor at Chuo University, Japan (2005), and visiting senior scholar at London School of Economics (LSE) (2007-2008).

 

ABOUT THE Ph.D. STUDENTS AND POST-DOC FELLOWS

David Benson, Post-Doc Fellow, Southern Methodist University

Mariya Grinberg, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Chicago

Gentry Kip Jenkins, Ph. D. Candidate, University of Chicago

Stephanie Kelley, Graduate Student, University of Chicago

Shen Dongpu, Ph.D. Candidate, Peking University

Yubing Sheng, Ph. D. Candidate, University of Chicago

Sun Bingyan, Ph.D. Candidate, Peking University

Wu Shengqi, Post-Doc Fellow, Peking University

Yin Chengzhi, Ph.D. Candidate, Peking University